employment, job hunting, job search

Live Long and Prosper…as a Job Hunter in your 50s, 60s & 70s

People are living longer, which means that they have to work longer to support themselves…which means being a job candidate instead of a retiree.

We often think of job hunters as being young, maybe right out of college. But, let’s not forget that job hunters are also in their 50s, 60s & 70s. You may know of one, be one, or will be one.

There’s an interesting article by Kerry Hannon in AARP Magazine, Feb/Mar 2015 about 8 common mistakes that older job seekers make, and how to fix them.

Here are Hannon’s “Mistakes” and my comments about them:

Mistake #1

“I’ll job hunt but otherwise just kick back and enjoy the break.”

Don’t waste any time. Offer your services to local companies since they may not be able to hire an employee, but they might afford a consultant. If can’t find a paid position, volunteer your skills to an organization that you support. The goal is to keep working, so you can make contacts and network for your next gig.

Mistake #2

“I’ve had my AOL account since 1993!”

I disagree somewhat with Hannon on this one. Having an AOL email address doesn’t mean you’re old, it shows that you’ve had a digital presence for a long time, and that you’re loyal (by sticking with a good-service company). If you want a Gmail account, get one. Use it just for your job search, and keep AOL for personal stuff.

Mistake #3

“I’m proud no one can find me online.”

Be realistic…nothing online is private. You can and will be found IF someone wants to find you. Don’t make them jump through hoops when it’s YOU who wants a job. Show your digital presence. Show you’re tech-savvy by being on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram; create a website; write a blog.

Mistake #4

“I refuse to take a job for less pay than I was making before.”

You can have a bottom line of what you’ll accept, but make sure that it’s based on financial needs and not ego. Better to take less than have nothing. Better to have a job when/if seeking another job. Get the experience, put it on your resume, and try to negotiate additional benefits in lieu of more money.

Mistake #5

“I don’t like bothering people.”

You must market yourself. Let everyone know of your search. They may know someone who knows someone who can help you. You can’t do all the leg work yourself so let your support network assist you.

Mistake #6

“The longer my resume, the more impressed employers will be.”

Size matters. One or two pages is all you need but either should be packed with quantified accomplishments and not job descriptions. Job history only needs to go back 10-15 years. Consider leaving years of graduation off of resume.

Mistake #7

“I’m not going to apply since I don’t meet all the job requirements.”

A want ad is a wish list. There may not be a candidate with all the qualifications but you may come the closest, so apply. Don’t rule yourself out…let them decide if you meet their requirements.

Mistake #8

“If I’m patient, a job perfectly suited to my experiences will come along.”

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re too good or too experienced for a job. There is no “perfect” job, so be willing to take a new challenge that may be different from what you’ve had previously. Use your achievements to demonstrate your potential.

Learn how to be more marketable at BestOfYouResumes.com.

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